Wildlife Viewing

Porcupine Caribou Herd

If there’s one animal that is inextricably tied to the social, cultural and economic fabric of northern communities, it’s the caribou. Yukon's Porcupine caribou herd ranges across much of the territory, migrating each year from wintering grounds in central Yukon to calving grounds along the Beaufort Sea coast. It’s one of the longest land migrations in the world, offering visitors several wildlife viewing opportunities along the way.

Mountain Sheep

With more wild sheep than any other part of Canada, the Yukon is a great place to spot these majestic animals. Most of the more than 20,000 Yukon sheep are pure white Dall sheep, and less than a fifth are darker Stone sheep. Visitors have some excellent chances to see these mountain sheep (also known as thinhorns) on traditional feeding grounds, some of which are visible from roads. Most mountain sheep retreat to high alpine meadows in the summer but usually stay at lower elevations the rest of the year.

Bird Migrations

When North America’s migratory birds set out each spring in search of northern habitat to feed, nest and rear their young, millions of them wing their way to the Yukon. Three of the continent’s four major migration flyways converge across the Yukon.

Grizzly Bears

Grizzlies thrive in some of the wildest places in North America, which is why they are so at home in the Yukon. For many people, grizzly bears are a symbol of wilderness, and no other wild animal captures our imaginations as much as they do. Grizzly bears inhabit the entire territory, from Kluane National Park to Herschel Island, and the continent’s healthiest, most genetically diverse population of grizzly bears is in Kluane.