Unpublished

Relive the Klondike Gold Rush

Visit historic Dawson City and relive the heady days of the Klondike Gold Rush. The lure of the Klondike drew thousands of young menand some determined womenwith the glint of gold in their eyes to Dawson City. Entrepreneurs keen to turn a dollar erected hastily constructed buildings with elaborate false fronts. Horses trotted through the muddy streets and dancehall tunes filled the air. Dawson City became a bustling commercial centre at the turn of the century, and for a time was the largest city north of San Francisco and west of Winnipeg.

 

A tight-knit town of 1,500 people and the Yukon’s second largest community, Dawson City is a colourful place where you can still meet placer miners, dog mushers and other Klondike characters. Today, Dawson City is in many ways just as it was at the height of the Gold Rush in 1898. The streets of this authentic frontier town are lined with wooden boardwalks, and you can sense the grit, heartache and golden dreams of the Klondike Gold Rush as you meander down Dawson City's streets. A lively place bursting with heritage sites and attractions, there is lots to do in Dawson and the city hosts ;many visitor services, amenities and attractions.

Walk among the carefully restored buildings with costumed inter­preters and feel like you’re stepping back in time. Visit the Dawson City Museum, Dawson City Visitor Information Centre on Front Street, take a walking tour with Parks Canada, explore Dawson City Museum and Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre. During the Gold Rush, Dawson was home to a wide assortment of casinos, beer halls and brothels—try your hand at blackjack or take in a show at Diamond Tooth Gerties gambling hall. First Nations cultural experiences and wilderness adventures are an important part of the Klondike experience. Dawson City is a convenient base from which to explore the Dempster Highway to Tombstone Park, the Arctic Circle and North Yukon, and across the Yukon River to the Top of the World Highway.